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The Price Of Cigarettes Will Rise In Australia From Today

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The Price Of Cigarettes Will Rise In Australia From Today

It's a brutal day to be a cigarette smoker in Australia as the Federal government's tobacco excise kicks into gear today (1 September).

Aussies were warned that prices would increase by 12.5 percent, cementing Down Under's place as the most expensive country in the world to buy a packet of ciggies.

A typical packet of 20 cigarettes will now set you back on average around AUD $40 (£22 / US $30), which is a hell of a lot of money if you burn through darts like a chimney.

The cheapest you can expect to pay is around AUD $29 (£16 / US $21), while a 25-pack of Marlboro Golds will hit almost AUD $49 (£27 / US $36).

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The cost of bags of tobacco is also expected to increase.

Credit: PA
Credit: PA

If you're a pack-a-day smoker then you will pay around AUD $14,600 (£8,000 / US $10,800) a year on smokes.

It's the eighth year in a row the Federal government's excise has increased the price of cigarettes and they're hoping the cost squeeze will push more people off the habit.

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The Morrison government rakes in around $17 billion a year in tobacco taxes and that's set to rise along with the price of ciggies.

The World Health Organisation believes price hikes are 'the single most effective way to encourage tobacco users to quit and prevent children from starting to smoke'.

The WHO released a statement, saying: "Evidence from countries of all income levels shows that price increases on cigarettes are highly effective in reducing demand. Higher prices encourage cessation and prevent initiation of tobacco use.

Credit: PA
Credit: PA
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"They also reduce relapse among those who have quit and reduce consumption among continuing users.

"On average, a 10 percent price increase on a pack of cigarettes would be expected to reduce demand for cigarettes by about four percent in high-income countries and by about five percent in low- and middle-income countries, where lower incomes tend to make people more sensitive to price changes.

"Children and adolescents are also more sensitive to price increases than adults, allowing price interventions to have a significant impact on this age group.

Interestingly, it doesn't seem like that statement stacks up in Australia.

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Statistics from the Australian Bureau of Statistics show there has only been a 0.7 per cent decrease in the number of smokers between 2014-15 and 2017-18.

Authorities have also noticed an uptick in the amount of black market tobacco being sold across Australia as the price of legal ciggies increases.

Featured Image Credit: PA

Topics: News, Australia

Stewart Perrie
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