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People Who Use These 10 Emojis Are Officially Old, According To Young People

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People Who Use These 10 Emojis Are Officially Old, According To Young People

Do you ever receive a text from a family member which contains just a singular emoji? Sure, we all have.

But do you then chuckle to yourself that you'd have to be really old to be seen sending that sort of thing? Perhaps not - but it seems that today's youth reckon that's the case. They say using certain emojis marks you out as someone from an older generation, according to a new survey.

The emojis could be anything from the 'thumbs up' symbol to the grimacing face emoji - both are on the list of those emojis considered to be some of the most uncool. Ouch *inserts loudly crying face*.

No offence to the person in the picture. He's a software engineer called Mark Davis who was responsible for deciding facial expressions, figures and objects people can use. Credit: PA
No offence to the person in the picture. He's a software engineer called Mark Davis who was responsible for deciding facial expressions, figures and objects people can use. Credit: PA
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A nationwide survey has found that people still using the 'thumbs up' emoji are officially over the hill, as it was voted the single uncoolest emoji by 16- to 29-year-olds with 24 percent of the vote.

Sending a red heart (22 percent), an 'OK hand' (20 percent), or a 'crying face' (16 percent), is also deeply old-fashioned and something a young person would never do, according to the poll.

Here, for your reassurance, are the ten emojis that mark you out as an old person:

These emojis mark you out as an old person.
These emojis mark you out as an old person.
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Feeling old yet?

According to the data, by research and insight agency Perspectus Global, the average Brit sends a staggering 76 emojis every week, but some are now seen as seriously outdated.

In fact, 24 percent of the Zoomers surveyed consider the 'thumbs up' emoji to be old-fashioned and cringeworthy, while 17 percent said that the 'check mark', signifying 'done', is seriously uncool. How is one supposed to complete a to-do list?

Credit: PA
Credit: PA
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Other emojis that indicate you are clueless about modern culture are the poo emoji (also 17 percent), the 'monkey with hands over face' emoji (15 percent) and the 'clapping hands' emoji (10 percent). Anyone else feeling seen the more this article goes on?

Overall, the poll of 2,000 Brits found that the most popular emoji, across all ages, was the laughing face crying tears of joy (45 percent).

While the least popular symbol, again across all demographics, was the sinister skull and crossbones emoji (28 percent said it was their least favourite emoji).

On top of that, it seems that emoji-mishaps are rife, as 78 percent of Brits admit they have innocently used a symbol (often repeatedly) before finding out it had a different, ruder meaning.

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Credit: PA
Credit: PA

Furthermore, using multiple emojis to make a text even clearer is commonplace, with 22 percent of people doing so in every message they send.

Evie Porter of Perspectus Global said: "With the average Briton sending 76 emojis a week, across multiple platforms, it's clear that these symbols are now a vital part of our daily communication - on both a personal and professional level.

"Yet this research indicates the importance of assessing which ones you use. Unless you want to be seen as old fashioned, it seems wise to avoid the thumbs up symbol."

Featured Image Credit: PA

Topics: UK News, News, UK

Rebecca Shepherd
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